Decentralized finance MOOC for African self-management of its science and technology

Paul G. Murphy, Research Affiliate at the Berkeley Institute for Business Innovation

In May 2022, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) announced that the convergence of rising energy prices, climate change, food insecurity and financial volatility was its “greatest test since World War II”. world”. As faith in democracy falters alongside the ability of international organizations to address the roots of the 2008 financial crisis, citizens, civil society, academics and the private sector confront public officials by harnessing the power of data and open technologies. Even though fraud is pervasive in the crypto ecosystem, censorship resistance and self-sovereignty are more persistent technical innovations in account keeping than use as a vehicle for gambling. This reality requires leaders to educate themselves on decentralized finance, its narrative and its challenge to traditional financial systems, as this new infrastructure is open to anyone with an internet connection.

The pressure exerted by blockchain far exceeds the influence of the IMF’s regulatory ambitions to restore trust in the global system. The modernization of a global system of cross-border payments aims to recover 45 billion dollars a year from the hands of remittance intermediaries. Nothing less to appease advances in blockchain technology in security, privacy, and decentralization. Therefore, we must treat financial market corruption as a technical problem, not a moral or legal one. Thanks to technical training, sub-Saharan Africa does not need to compromise to catch up as the most expensive market to send remittances, with a cost of 8.17% against a global average of 6, 3%.

However, the democratization of public financial management systems does not guarantee responsiveness to the needs of the population. Institutional readiness requires demystifying the benefits of blockchain in centralized finance alongside the powerful narrative of decentralized finance.

As Benjamin Laker pointed out in his Forbes article, leaders must be prepared with the tools to seize the opportunities that arise as blockchain technology becomes easier to use, inspiring more people to revolutionize the way to connect, communicate and earn money. Otherwise, it is impossible to decipher the South African government’s decision to regulate crypto transactions, alongside Nigeria, Kenya and Ghana’s ban. With the launch of Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDC), blockchain transparency, trust and efficiency will not be enough to transform the Pan-African Payment and Settlement System (PAPSS). To truly boost intra-African trade in the era of de-globalization, the African Union must promote a knowledge society in line with Agenda 2063 to democratize finance for the needs of their people. Legal frameworks and regulatory compliance can incorporate technology autonomy to support actors’ autonomy and self-management of knowledge.

With the rise of biometric identity verification in centralized and decentralized finance to combat fraud, the articulation of modernity is vital for the selective incorporation of technology into a sovereign economic and cultural order. Furthermore, digitization of every activity, including learning, compels leaders to explore cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology to compete and boost the economy.

Join, starting August 30, 2022, a 15-week massive open online course (MOOC) on decentralized finance. Leading researchers from Stanfordof Imperial College London, from the University of Illinois and the University of California at Berkeley will guide students from more than 30 countries on issues of social welfare, privacy protection, equity promotion, inclusion and ethics in decentralized finance. Participants will receive coursework including weekly quizzes, two lab exercises, and an optional group project. For more information, please visit: https://defi-learning.org

Biography by Paul G. Murphy

With over fourteen years of interdisciplinary and experiential knowledge to link food and energy security, Paul G. Murphy has worked in Canada for government departments, sales and distribution, waste management, organic agricultural cooperatives, and banks. food. As a research associate with Rural Municipalities of Alberta, he has led several projects aimed at broadening and deepening the participation of citizens who affirm sustainability in the world’s largest energy democracy. His participation in many non-governmental organizations internationally has allowed him to understand the need for open innovation to renew development between governments, companies and universities. He is a board member of the Association for Science and the Common Good (ASBC), which works to improve access to publications and resources for citizens advocating for cognitive rights around the world, including by Africa and Haiti. Currently, he is a Research Fellow at TELUS Corporation and a Smart Village Research Affiliate at theInstitute for Business Innovation from the University of California at Berkeley.

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French version

With over fourteen years of interdisciplinary and experiential knowledge to connect food and energy security, Paul Murphy has worked in Canada for government ministries, sales and distribution, waste management, organic farm cooperatives, food banks and soup kitchens. As a Research Associate with the Rural Municipalities of Alberta, he has led a several ventures to expand and deepen citizen participation that affirms sustainability in the world’s largest energy democracy. His involvement with numerous non-government organizations internationally helped him understand the need for Open Innovation to transform development between government, business, and university. He is a board member with the Association science et bien commun (ASBC) that works to advance publishing access and resources for citizens advocating cognitive globally with a focus on Africa and Haiti. Currently, he is a Research Fellow with TELUS Corporation and Smart Village Research Affiliate with the Institute for Business Innovation at the University of California, Berkeley.

Decentralized Finance MOOC for African Self-Rule of its Science and Technology

Paul G.Murphy, Research Affiliate Berkeley Institute for Business Innovation

In May 2022, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) announced that the convergence of rising energy prices, climate change, food insecurity, financial volatility was their “biggest test since the Second World War.” As confidence in democracy flooders alongside international organization’s ability to resolve the root of the 2008 financial crisis, residents, civil society, academics, and the private sector are confronting public officials by mobilizing the power of open data and technologies. Even as fraud pervades the crypto ecosystem, the resistance to censorship and self-sovereignty are more persistent technical innovations in ledger keeping than usage as a gambling vehicle. This reality obliges leaders to educate themselves on decentralized finance, their narrative and challenge to traditional financial systems as this new infrastructure is open to anyone with an internet connection.

The pressure of blockchain is far beyond the influence of the IMFs regulatory ambitions to restore trust in the global system. The modernization of a cross-border payments globally to recover $45 billion per year from the hands of remittance intermediaries is insufficient to appease blockchain technology advances in security, privacy, and decentralization. As a result, we must treat the corruption of financial markets as a technical problem, not moral or legal one. With technical training, there is no need for Sub-Saharan Africa to compromise on closing the gap as the most expensive market to send remittances at a cost of 8.17 percent compared to the global average of 6.3 percent. However, democratizing public finance management systems does not guarantee responsiveness to population needs. Institutional readiness requires demystifying the benefits of blockchain in centralized finance, alongside the powerful narrative of decentralized finance.

As Benjamin Laker pointed out in an article in Forbes, leaders must be prepped with the tools to sixteen opportunities as blockchain technology becomes easier to use, inciting more people to revolutionize the way to connect, communicate, and earn. Otherwise, it is impossible to decipher the South African government’s decision to regulate crypto transactions, alongside Nigeria, Kenya, and Ghana’s ban. With the launch Central Bank Digital Currencies (CBDC), blockchain’s transparency, trust and efficiency alone will not transform the Pan-African Payment and Settlement System (PAPSS). To truly boost intra-African trade in an era of deglobalization, the African Union must link the 2063 Agenda of becoming a knowledge society by the democratization of finance for the needs of their population. Legal frameworks and regulation compliance can integrate the self-rule of technology to support actor knowledge autonomy and self-governance.

With the rise of biometric identity verification in centralized and decentralized finance to combat fraud, articulating modernity is vital to the selective incorporation of technology in a sovereign economic and cultural order. Furthermore, the digitization of every activity, including learning, obliges leaders to explore cryptocurrency and blockchain technology to be competitive and boost the economy. Join from August 30, 2022, a 15-week Decentralized Finance Massive Open Online Courses (MOOC). Leading researchers from Stanford, Imperial College London, the University of Illinois, and the University of California, Berkeley will guide students from over 30 countries through question of social welfare, privacy protection, promoting fairness, inclusiveness, and ethics in decentralized finance. Participants are given course work that includes weekly quizzes, two lab exercises, and an optional group project. For more information please visit: https://defi-learning.org/

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